Yet Tuh Image

The name "Yet Tuh" roughly translates as "the place where something used to be." Hang-ho Lee still relies on contacts in Korea to ship hard-to-find ingredients over, to make sure everything remains true to form. Lee's menu mashes up the unfamiliar alongside Korean staples, and shows that this is decidedly not your typical Korean barbecue or tofu house. Platters of simple grilled fish precede plates of mackerel boiled in spiced soy sauce; barley rice with vegetables and soybean paste follow an acorn jelly. There are elaborate stews and basic noodle soups, pancakes (pajeon), and roasted chicken hearts. Luckily, the staff, despite a bit of a language barrier, is happy to make suggestions.

Restaurant Details

Luck and a bit of advanced planning are required to locate this little place, but, once you do, you will be rewarded with a small oasis of Korean calm and thoughtfully prepared food. Hang-ho Lee's menu mashes up the unfamiliar alongside Korean staples, and shows that this is decidedly not your typical Korean barbecue or tofu house. Platters of simple grilled fish precede plates of mackerel boiled in spiced soy sauce; barley rice with vegetables and soybean paste follow an acorn jelly. Try the kimchi stew, a citrusy dish with yieldingly tender cabbage and still-crisp slivers of onion, or the barley rice, an earthy, wholesome bowl of grain that seems to define the term "destination dish."

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